Where Oblivion Lives by T. Frohock

Some books just click and this was one of those times. It wasn’t even that there is much in the way of my bullet-proof likes either - Angels are not an auto buy for me, and historical fantasy is probably closer to an auto-skip. But there was something about this story that resonated (a little pun intended) and part way through I knew I was going to have to go back and read the rest of the series, as soon as my schedule allowed.

Alien Stars by David Hambling

Alien Stars while keeping to the historical fiction genre, ventures deeper into Science Fiction. It also draws more from different mythologies and waves them together nicely. Alien Stars still has that unique atmosphere the other books also had: the prose is flowing, the characters are alive, and London leaps off the pages. If you are looking for a mystery, a historical fiction or even a science fiction novel, you'll get all three in one. If you haven't already checked out Harry Stubb's adventures, I really don't know what are you waiting for!

Fawkes by Nadine Brandes

Fawkes blends real historical events from 17th century England with fictitious characters and fantasy elements. The world building is seamless, London almost leaps off the pages. Nadine Brandes did her homework right and thoroughly researched the era and the events. The result is an intriguing, page turning story where you can't help but go through a wide range of emotions together with the characters.

Dissolution by C. J. Sansom

If you enjoy mystery, with a historical background, especially the Tudor era of England, then I strongly recommend giving a shot at Dissolution. It's gripping, makes you sit on the edge of your seat, even though it's not exactly fast paced. It will held your interest until the end, and you'll find yourself totally engrossed and waiting when you can continue reading on. Oh, and did I say it also adds a tiny twist to Anne Boleyn's story? Yeah, it has many, many layers you'll enjoy discovering. I also recommend listening to the audiobook, Steven Crossley did a really good job narrating it!

Wolf’s Head by Steven A. McKay

It brought back my childhood memories, mixed it with my adult self's love for english history and gritty elements, and pretty much blew my mind. Besides making me a dirty mouthed lunatic in the morning commute, on a tram full of people.

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