Three Crows Magazine #3 by Alex Khlopenko

This issue has less short stories, but it contains more other content. Such as an article in memory of Gene Wolfe, an interview with Gareth L. Powell, a game review of Sekiro, bookreview of Uncanny Collateral, a movie review of Illang, an article about the legacy of Sheri S. Tepper and an analysis about the Gormenghast series.

Crown by Jesse Teller

This is a very dark book/series all around - you know how Hell gets depicted as this scary screwed-up place full of intense horror images, and nasty stuff happening to good people… well, that’s the main world in this book.

Priest of Bones by Peter McLean

Priest of Bones deserves all the hype it got. If you ever wondered what would happen if you mixed a priest and the Godfather, then you can finally get your answer. Priest of Bones is an unputdownable character driven fantasy about organised crime, magic, political intrigue and a world left by the gods. I already can't wait for the sequel, Priest of Lies to learn what happens to these lovely rogues called Pious Men next.

The Bird King by G. Willow Wilson

A fellow blogger was reading this book and seemed to like it. It was right up my alley with it being historical fiction, set in Granada, 1492, so I went and requested a copy on Netgalley. I don't know if I had too high hopes for this one or expected something different, but reading The Bird King I found myself having pretty mixed feelings.

He Who Fights by Mike Morris

I did enjoy the journey and I quite liked a lot of the ideas in this story. And the fights. I really enjoyed the fights, and after my recent binge of fight movies, I felt I knew some of the moves they were pulling off, which is always cool. I will be curious to see where things go in later books, if there are any.

We Lie With Death by Devin Madson

We Lie With Death is cleverly written, intricate and addictive, merging genres like it's the most natural thing in the world, while handling topics with a sensitivity that shows Madson's genius. If you didn't read We Ride the Storm yet, start it now, because you don't want to miss We Lie With Death!

The Woven Ring by M.D. Presley

All things said, there is a lot to like about The Woven Ring. It's an imaginative flintlock fantasy with the potential of growing into a fantastic series. Maybe it's a bit rough around the edges, but no one can say The Woven Ring doesn't set a pretty solid foundation for the future for when Sol finally comes to harvest. 

Your Favorite Band Cannot Save You by Scotto Moore

Your Favorite Band Cannot Save You is a quick paced read, perfect for a road trip or just a quiet afternoon with a book. If you look for something different, it has a strange mix of music, humor, horror, sci-fi, maybe a tinge of Cthulhu mythos. If you liked We Sould Our Souls, you might like Your Favorite Band Cannot Save You as well. 

The Sword of Kaigen by M.L. Wang

Without Misaki this would have been a great book with some very cool fight scenes (I’m still in awe over the Matsuda brother’s Ice Dragon) and a good solid base for a later series. With her though - it became an outstanding piece of storytelling that needs to be experienced, and one that is going to stick with me for a long time.

Three Crows Magazine #2 by Alex Khlopenko

Three Crows Magazine had only started its journey, this only being the second issue, but I can already say it has a place in the market. It not only features critically acclaimed authors like Anna Smith Spark, but also gives a chance to upcoming, talented authors such as Gerard Mullen, Luke Frostick and T.A. Sola. All of their stories represent a different culture, giving us a glimpse into our beautiful, colorful world through the eyes of SFF.

Grimdark Magazine #18 by Adrian Collins

The Eighteenth issue of Grimdark Magazine (GDM) features a nice selection of authors with stories or various articles. You can read a short stories from Peter McLean, Cameron Johnston and Andy Remic, an interview with Devin Madson and Cameron Jonhston, two book reviews about The Igenious by Darius Hinks, plus two articles from Alan Baxter about his experience with publishing, and Mike Myers giving some useful tips.

The Glass Dagger by M.D. Presley

The Glass Dagger continues the story in the same style, with a current timeline picking up at the close of The Imbued Lockblade and a past, working forward timeline, giving us a new POV, that of Solace Graff. Now to be honest, I was a little hmm… about getting his background. He didn’t spark my interest quite like Luca did, but he ended up being an interesting character and we follow him as he leaves his home and sets off to school in Lisford with a single goal in mind - to be the greatest Weaver in all of Ayr.

The Whitefire Crossing by Courtney Schafer

This story finishes up tidily, while leaving lots of space to continue. I really liked how it set itself up for book two. There were a couple of additional characters added that I am excited to come back for - one of them being Captain Martennan and I’m hoping for more Cara. Overall this was a quick enjoyable read and I’m excited to continue this series.

Detonation Boulevard by Craig Schaefer

Detonation Boulevard is a fast paced, action packed middle book, which shows you just enough to make you want more, but holds off all the best parts to give an even bigger punch in the end. Highly imaginative, excellent world building and a story well worth your time.

An Imperial Gambit by Jeffrey L. Kohanek

Each book has opened this world up a little more, as we learn more of the world and the people, it gets harder to tell whose side is right and whose is wrong. The series itself is just a whole lot of fun and has been a nice little breather between dark and grim. I think this is the strongest one so far.  

Masters of Deception by JC Kang

For such a character heavy story this had a very complicated plot underneath. It reminded me of Oceans Eleven, not because there was a heist, but for that art of balancing groups of people, secret motivations, and character development through conversations and action as this big involved plot unfolds underneath. It takes some serious talent to balance all of that and keep things moving.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑