Sworn to the Night by Craig Schaefer

A wonderfully intriguing and delightfully brutal story after which you won't be able to resist grabbing the sequel. Schaefer brings urban fantasy to a whole new level mixing it with mystery, classical fantasy elements - witches and knights - and wrapping it into a brilliant, although totally crazy read. 

Chasing Graves by Ben Galley

Galley clearly knows what he is doing, and was able to wave together a story about life and death, revenge and greed, justice and blind fate. Chasing Graves is a dark, compelling entry into a trilogy. The characters and the world is complex and well-built, the story intriguing enough to make you want more. Even if I'm still waiting for that feeling of being completely impressed. So, Mr Galley when is the next book coming out again?

Tales of Kingshold by D. P. Woolliscroft

Tales of Kingshold is a collection of novelettes, short stories, letters and notes about events that happened before, after and during the election in Kingshold. We meet old and new characters, some of them likely to appear in later books. In my review I will focus on the novelettes and short stories, but let me note that I foud Jyuth's thoughts on magic pretty interesting and it was a good addition, explaining how the magic in this world works.

The Demons Within by Ashe Armstrong

This has a closed room horror feel at times, like Aliens or the Thing meets the old west. And there’s a nice nod to King’s Dark Tower series. With it’s old west feel and campy horror movie vibe, The Demons Within is a hugely fun entry into this series.

Danse Macabre by Laura M. Hughes

Danse Macabre is the perfect read for a cold, foggy autumn/winter afternoon which you spend curled up with a hot drink to chase away the chill of the weather and the story both. Blue and her journey will keep you glued to the pages, clench your heart and leave you utterly broken. It's not hard to imagine a world so cold and cruel as the one Blue lived in after all. 

The Prince of Cats by Daniel E. Olesen

There is something charming about The Prince of Cats despite its flaws, and the fact that it's not a heartwarming story. It's about revenge, freedom, relationships, keeping your enemies closer than friends. It has a sort of Arabian Nights vibe about it, especially the shepherd's story. I recommend to check this book out if you need a different setting, like to read about a thief, who is far from being perfect, or invulnerable.

Grimdark Magazine #17

The Seventeenth issue of Grimdark Magazine (GDM) features a nice selection of authors with stories or various articles. It features short stories from Devin Madson, Amanda J. Spedding and Brian Staveley, two interviews with Sebastian de Castell and Jen Williams, two book reviews about City of Kings by Rob J. Hayes and Chasing Graves by Ben Galley, plus an article from Anna Stephens which makes this magazine a complete and highly enjoyable brief read. Don't be surprised when you find yourself adding a few more books to your to-be-read mountain. Oops.

The Endless Ocean by Toby Bennett

This book is a rough diamond which needs some polishing, but man, you can see it shine anyway. The Endless Ocean is a tale of a great adventure to fantastical worlds, pirates, ancient creatures. Sinbad's adventures meets legends of the ancient era, giving birth to an epic fantasy worth your time. 

An American Weredeer in Michigan by C.T. Phipps and Michael Suttkus

Phipps obviously has fun writing this series and these characters, and if I put aside my misjudges, it's quite entertaining. But I can't decide if I should take this book seriously (does it takes itself seriously?) or should I just look at it as some popcorn fun. Even so, An American Weredeer in Michigan improved compared to I Was a Teenage Weredeer. I could lean back, read, and just enjoy myself while giggling at some of Jane's or the Merlin Gun's comments.

Darkness Forged by Matt Larkin

In Darkness Forged you might find everything you've been looking for: heroic fights, vengeance, violence (in many form), enveloped in norse mythology. This book has an oddly satisfying ending on the bittersweet side. If you are into grimdark, norse mythology, have a few hours to spare and don't mind having a dark twist in your read, I definitely recommend this book!

Symphony of the Wind by Steven McKinnon

Symphony of the Wind is intricate, surprising, and doesn't shy away from giving punches. If you like your fantasy dark, don't mind if the pace is a bit slower, want to be surprised and don't see what happens next, you should absolutely check this out! 

Servant of Rage by A.Z. Anthony

Servant of Rage is a blood soaked, intriguing first book of a trilogy. It's a bit rough around the edges, but Anthony clearly is a talented writer, who can pull out writing terror filled scenes as well as emotional ones. Servant of Rages manages to give in some punches and leaves enough questions open to make people come back and read what happens next. Overall, I would recommend to check it out if you didn't do so yet. 

Lost Lore: A Fantasy Anthology

You are looking for something new to sink your teeth into? Don't look anymore! Lost Lore has it all:  mythology, epic fantasy, grimdark, twisted fairy tales, cool assassins, unusual worlds, humor and a lot to think on! Sure, some of them has flaws, and won't be your taste, but on the other hand, you'll find some treasure which will make it worth. Besides, it's free and all of these indie authors are talented as hell. Give them a chance and you might find your next favorite author/series!

We Ride the Storm by Devin Madson

We Ride the Storm is a strong first book, which builds up the conflict and leaves plenty of questions to be answered for the next installment in the series. It's a bloody, character driven, headless... err, endless fun. The hype is real and well earned. I wouldn't be surprised if it landed on many lists at the end of the year as one of the best fantasy books in 2018.

Those Brave, Foolish Souls from the City of Swords by Benedict Patrick

Those Brave, Foolish Souls from the City of Swords is Zorro meets The Three Musketeers. It has adventure, exciting sword fights, clashing morals. The reckless youthfulness meets the wise seasoned fighter and sets sparkles. And of course there is no Benedict Patrick novel without rich mythology and folklore to make the Yarnsworld a place you'd like to visit. Those Brave, Foolish Souls from the City of Swords is a tale about heroes, braveness, selflessness, sorrow, revenge, regrets and chances to begin again.

Alien Stars by David Hambling

Alien Stars while keeping to the historical fiction genre, ventures deeper into Science Fiction. It also draws more from different mythologies and waves them together nicely. Alien Stars still has that unique atmosphere the other books also had: the prose is flowing, the characters are alive, and London leaps off the pages. If you are looking for a mystery, a historical fiction or even a science fiction novel, you'll get all three in one. If you haven't already checked out Harry Stubb's adventures, I really don't know what are you waiting for!

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