Where Oblivion Lives by T. Frohock

Some books just click and this was one of those times. It wasn’t even that there is much in the way of my bullet-proof likes either - Angels are not an auto buy for me, and historical fantasy is probably closer to an auto-skip. But there was something about this story that resonated (a little pun intended) and part way through I knew I was going to have to go back and read the rest of the series, as soon as my schedule allowed.

Three Crows Magazine #2 by Alex Khlopenko

Three Crows Magazine had only started its journey, this only being the second issue, but I can already say it has a place in the market. It not only features critically acclaimed authors like Anna Smith Spark, but also gives a chance to upcoming, talented authors such as Gerard Mullen, Luke Frostick and T.A. Sola. All of their stories represent a different culture, giving us a glimpse into our beautiful, colorful world through the eyes of SFF.

Melokai by Rosalyn Kelly

I really wished I could like Melokai given some of my friends did, but I just couldn't. I gave it a fair chance, but at the end of the day, I just had to give up forcing myself to go on. 

Where She Went by Gayle Forman

Even though I veered away from YA books in recent years, I don't mind picking up Gayle Forman's books every once in a while. Especially Where She Went, a heartwrenching, emotional read which will make you curse and smile and cry. A fast and sweet read for cold winter days. 

Grimdark Magazine #18 by Adrian Collins

The Eighteenth issue of Grimdark Magazine (GDM) features a nice selection of authors with stories or various articles. You can read a short stories from Peter McLean, Cameron Johnston and Andy Remic, an interview with Devin Madson and Cameron Jonhston, two book reviews about The Igenious by Darius Hinks, plus two articles from Alan Baxter about his experience with publishing, and Mike Myers giving some useful tips.

The Glass Dagger by M.D. Presley

The Glass Dagger continues the story in the same style, with a current timeline picking up at the close of The Imbued Lockblade and a past, working forward timeline, giving us a new POV, that of Solace Graff. Now to be honest, I was a little hmm… about getting his background. He didn’t spark my interest quite like Luca did, but he ended up being an interesting character and we follow him as he leaves his home and sets off to school in Lisford with a single goal in mind - to be the greatest Weaver in all of Ayr.

The Raven Tower by Ann Leckie

If you like your epic fantasy to be less action packed and more focused on the events that lead to the main plot, you might find this one in your favor. The Raven Tower offers the tale of slow burning revange, sacrifice and tragedy.

Jack and Jill: Up a Hill by Vance Smith

This is a fun, quirky little story with a bit of a deeper “big bad” plot underneath. Though I am probably a little older than the target age - I really enjoyed it and never felt that it was too young for me plot-wise or character-wise.

The Whitefire Crossing by Courtney Schafer

This story finishes up tidily, while leaving lots of space to continue. I really liked how it set itself up for book two. There were a couple of additional characters added that I am excited to come back for - one of them being Captain Martennan and I’m hoping for more Cara. Overall this was a quick enjoyable read and I’m excited to continue this series.

Detonation Boulevard by Craig Schaefer

Detonation Boulevard is a fast paced, action packed middle book, which shows you just enough to make you want more, but holds off all the best parts to give an even bigger punch in the end. Highly imaginative, excellent world building and a story well worth your time.

An Imperial Gambit by Jeffrey L. Kohanek

Each book has opened this world up a little more, as we learn more of the world and the people, it gets harder to tell whose side is right and whose is wrong. The series itself is just a whole lot of fun and has been a nice little breather between dark and grim. I think this is the strongest one so far.  

Masters of Deception by JC Kang

For such a character heavy story this had a very complicated plot underneath. It reminded me of Oceans Eleven, not because there was a heist, but for that art of balancing groups of people, secret motivations, and character development through conversations and action as this big involved plot unfolds underneath. It takes some serious talent to balance all of that and keep things moving.

Sworn to the Night by Craig Schaefer

A wonderfully intriguing and delightfully brutal story after which you won't be able to resist grabbing the sequel. Schaefer brings urban fantasy to a whole new level mixing it with mystery, classical fantasy elements - witches and knights - and wrapping it into a brilliant, although totally crazy read. 

Chasing Graves by Ben Galley

Galley clearly knows what he is doing, and was able to wave together a story about life and death, revenge and greed, justice and blind fate. Chasing Graves is a dark, compelling entry into a trilogy. The characters and the world is complex and well-built, the story intriguing enough to make you want more. Even if I'm still waiting for that feeling of being completely impressed. So, Mr Galley when is the next book coming out again?

Tales of Kingshold by D. P. Woolliscroft

Tales of Kingshold is a collection of novelettes, short stories, letters and notes about events that happened before, after and during the election in Kingshold. We meet old and new characters, some of them likely to appear in later books. In my review I will focus on the novelettes and short stories, but let me note that I foud Jyuth's thoughts on magic pretty interesting and it was a good addition, explaining how the magic in this world works.

The Demons Within by Ashe Armstrong

This has a closed room horror feel at times, like Aliens or the Thing meets the old west. And there’s a nice nod to King’s Dark Tower series. With it’s old west feel and campy horror movie vibe, The Demons Within is a hugely fun entry into this series.

Danse Macabre by Laura M. Hughes

Danse Macabre is the perfect read for a cold, foggy autumn/winter afternoon which you spend curled up with a hot drink to chase away the chill of the weather and the story both. Blue and her journey will keep you glued to the pages, clench your heart and leave you utterly broken. It's not hard to imagine a world so cold and cruel as the one Blue lived in after all. 

The Prince of Cats by Daniel E. Olesen

There is something charming about The Prince of Cats despite its flaws, and the fact that it's not a heartwarming story. It's about revenge, freedom, relationships, keeping your enemies closer than friends. It has a sort of Arabian Nights vibe about it, especially the shepherd's story. I recommend to check this book out if you need a different setting, like to read about a thief, who is far from being perfect, or invulnerable.

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