Monthly Wrap Up: June 2018

Well, June is over now, and it was another eventful month - both emotionally and otherwise. I attended concerts, read books, got awesome news. Find the details in my #MonthlyWrapUp post 🙂

Dissolution by C. J. Sansom

If you enjoy mystery, with a historical background, especially the Tudor era of England, then I strongly recommend giving a shot at Dissolution. It's gripping, makes you sit on the edge of your seat, even though it's not exactly fast paced. It will held your interest until the end, and you'll find yourself totally engrossed and waiting when you can continue reading on. Oh, and did I say it also adds a tiny twist to Anne Boleyn's story? Yeah, it has many, many layers you'll enjoy discovering. I also recommend listening to the audiobook, Steven Crossley did a really good job narrating it!

Interview with Barry Kerch from Shinedown

"I truly enjoy what I love, we all do. We love to do this, we love to play for the fans, we love to create music. It's what we do. And we still belong, we still like each other, we still ride the same bus together, we still get to dinner together. It's a family. And I enjoy playing on stage with those guys, we have a really good time doing it. I think if it wasn't fun anymore, we would have to stop, but it's still fun."

Where Loyalties Lie by Rob J. Hayes

If you love grimdark, you look for a book with self-absorbed pirates, plenty of action, blood and adventure, then Where Loyalties Lie is for you. It's witty, it's brutal, it's bloody, it's dark and it's impossible to put down. There is plenty of rum, fight, plotting against each other, secrets well-kept, magic and interesting enough characters.

Wolf’s Head by Steven A. McKay

It brought back my childhood memories, mixed it with my adult self's love for english history and gritty elements, and pretty much blew my mind. Besides making me a dirty mouthed lunatic in the morning commute, on a tram full of people.

I Was A Teenage Weredeer by C. T. Phipps and Michael Suttkus

I Was A Teenage Weredeer is a rather light, fun read with pop cultural references from Game of Thrones, Star Wars, Buffy and many others fan probably will deerly love and enjoy. Those who like YA will find this an enjoyable read with a snarky heroine, several supernatural species and a mystery that holds a few twists.

Some Distant Sunrise by Elliott Downing

Some Distant Sunrise is a powerfully emotional, dark tale of addiction, second chances, choices and life. One the writing makes even more real, where you can almost feel the needle's cold, metallic touch on your arm, the biting cold of the night and feel the pressure of the world as it closes on you, taste the desperation in the air.

And Then There Were Crows by Alcy Leyva

Then There Were Crows is a fast paced, enjoyable read - if you have a certain kind of humor and don't mind some violence here and there. This is a rather dark, horroresque urban fantasy with unique characterisation and promising ideas. With some improvements here and there (editing, writing - see my complaints above) this series can grow into something good and worthy of attention all fans of horror, dark fantasy, urban fantasy and everyone in between who like their story with a good measure of snark and violence.

Broken Meats by David Hambling

You'd think occultism, chinese culture and their 'secret' societies and Jack the Ripper makes a unusual mix. They do. And still, it works and that's what makes Broken Meats such an enjoyable read.

Song by Jesse Teller

Song is an action driven dark fantasy with a medieval like setting, mages fighting for revenge, for the nation, for everything worth figthing for.

Music Monday: Stuck by Adelitas Way

It was a tight call between Fur Cue by Seether and Stuck by @adelitasway. I went for this because that's exactly how I feel right now. I even dreamed being stuck, and when the word came to me, the song did as well.

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